617-363-8000

Date
12/01/2016
Title
Surgery and Cognition
Sub Title
Delirium, Cognitive Decline, and Opportunities to Protect the Brain
Article

Featuring: Sharon K. Inouye, M.D., M.P.H., Director, Aging Brain Center, Institute for Aging Research
Presented by The Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation and the Brain Dysfunction Discussion Group

Tens of millions of surgeries are conducted in the U.S. every year on people over the age of 65. With surgical procedures becoming increasingly safer and capable of promoting continued mobility and functionality into old age, the frequency of surgeries in the elderly will probably continue to rise. And yet, these procedures can have a dark side: for a significant percentage of elderly patients, anesthesia and surgery can lead to postoperative delirium and possibly long-term cognitive decline.

The risk of experiencing these postoperative complications depends on the type of surgery and the condition of any given patient. Despite the high incidence of these conditions, they are often overlooked in the clinic, and their underlying mechanism and long-term effects are poorly understood. On June 21, 2016, the Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation partnered with the Brain Dysfunction Discussion Group at the Academy to convene Surgery and Cognition: Delirium, Cognitive Decline, and Opportunities to Protect the Brain. At this meeting, leading scientists and physicians discussed the challenges and opportunities to creating biomarkers and therapeutics for patients who are vulnerable to delirium, cognitive decline, and dementia following surgery.

Listen to the Audio Presentation by Sharon K. Inouye, M.D., M.P.H., Director, Aging Brain Center, Institute for Aging Research