Russian Services Nursing Home Long-Term Care in Boston

Bilingual Services Frequently Asked Questions


Is Hebrew Rehabilitation Center a nursing home?
No, Hebrew Rehabilitation Center is a chronic care hospital. While the two are similar in focus (they both care for patients in a long-term care setting), our onsite medical department and ancillary services such as radiology and laboratory make us quite different from a regular nursing home. Because we have many of the same services as an acute care hospital, except for an emergency department and operating rooms, we are able to care for residents with nearly any medical condition.

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What are the steps to get a long-term care bed?
We accept referrals from hospitals, senior care facilities (i.e., assisted living), physicians, family members, and seniors in the community. Interested future residents are admitted based on their need for long-term care services, the availability of beds, and their assessed level of care. If an applicant lives in the community, one of our social workers will follow the senior throughout the application process to assist the senior and family members in decision making and to provide support during the transition period from application to admission.

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How does one get into your short-term rehabilitation unit?
One of our clinical nurse liaisons will conduct an onsite clinical evaluation to determine if the referral to one of our short-term units is appropriate. If the referral is appropriate for admission, the liaison will work with our Admissions office to coordinate admission to the unit. If the applicant is in the hospital or a sub-acute facility, a referral to HRC is initiated either by the family or a case manager. An HRC clinical nurse liaison will conduct an evaluation at the hospital, which is forwarded to our Admissions office to determine if the placement is appropriate. Generally, a decision on whether an admission is appropriate is made within a few hours. We have two short-term units. The Rehabilitative Services Unit offers rehabilitation services for those preparing to return to the community after an acute hospital stay. The Medical Acute Care Unit provides extended medical and rehabilitative care for patients with complex medical conditions.

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Do you have bilingual staff and Russian-speaking physicians?
Yes. We have more than 80 bilingual staff, including physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, therapists, and nursing assistants who speak both Russian and English. Many other HRC employees are bilingual, as well.

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What kind of activities do you have?
Our recreation and creative arts therapists offer residents a wide range of activities in Russian to enhance quality of life and provide opportunities for continued personal growth. These activities include music, discussion groups, word games, art projects, concerts, going out for tours and lunch, table games, etc. Our programs and activities are based on residents' needs and interests. Special attention is given to ensure that these programs are adapted to meet the various ability levels and backgrounds of our residents.

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What about exercise?
We offer a robust exercise program in which residents can work out under the close supervision of specialized trainers, including an exercise group for Russian-speaking residents twice a week. Depending on a resident's medical condition, however, some physical activities are not language based (i.e., those for which residents need to respond to verbal or written directions) and instead use music, art or other creative expression.

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Can my mother go for a walk? Are residents supervised on the patio?
We encourage our residents to get fresh air if they are medically able to do so. Our patio is a safe, enclosed area. Supervision of residents is dependent on their level of care. Those who are able to be outside without supervision have free access to the patio area. Groups of residents who are not independent are supervised when they are on the patio.

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Are all Russian-speaking residents grouped together?
No. We have two fully bilingual units that care for 80 Russian-speaking residents; however, a significant number of our Russian-speaking residents are on other units, depending on their medical condition. Our residents are placed on units based on their medical needs, not the language they speak.

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Do you have Russian TV channels?
We have four Russian television channels throughout HRC. They broadcast news, popular movies, concerts, shows, etc. Russian television is free of charge for our residents.

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Can we bring food from the Russian grocery store? Can we put a refrigerator in the room?
We encourage family members and guests to bring in Russian food if it increases a resident's quality of life. We are still a kosher facility; however, there is some leniency if certain foods help to improve quality of life. Unfortunately, we are unable to accommodate private refrigerators in any resident's room, unless it is a medical necessity.

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Will my father have someone to talk to in Russian?
Always. We have more than 130 Russian-speaking residents at HRC, as well as a large number of employees who are bilingual. Even if there are not other Russian-speaking residents on your relative's unit, we can bring to him or her to Russian-language activities on other units.

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How can I get my loved one a private room?
If a resident wants a private room, the family or resident is charged an additional $65 per day. If a resident needs a private room for a medical reason (e.g., to prevent the spread of an infection), there is no additional charge. When the medical need is resolved, the resident will be moved to a semi-private room when one becomes available. If they choose to stay in the private room, they will be charged the additional fee.

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How are roommate conflicts resolved?
If at all possible, we try to resolve roommate conflicts without moving residents from their current living arrangements. We try to improve these situations through negotiation and compromise, with both the residents and their families. On occasion, residents may change rooms if incompatibility requires it. It is important to remember that we have a finite number of rooms available. We are, however, creative in our approach to roommate conflicts, and we have a high success rate in satisfactorily resolving them.

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Under what circumstances might my relative be moved from one unit to another?
While we try to minimize moving residents from one unit to another, we reserve the right to do so for medical necessity or safety.

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How long do we have to wait to get in? Will it be faster if my parent goes into short-term rehabilitation first?
There is no single waiting list for admission to HRC. Our waiting list is intended for applicants who are actively pursuing admission and would be prepared to move into our facility immediately. The length of time an applicant might wait for admission is based on multiple factors, including the future resident's care needs and bed availability, and could range from a few days to a number of months. Patients in our short-term units do not necessarily gain admission to our long-term care units faster than others; however, we will be able to make a more accurate medical assessment of these patients since they are onsite, which can save time.

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Are there interpreters on the short-term units?
Yes. Many HRC employees are bilingual, and we also employ per-diem interpreters.

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We are going on vacation. Can you admit my parent for a month while we are away?
No. HRC does not provide respite care like this.

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Where on your Web site can we see how HRC is rated?
HRC's two short-term, sub-acute units-the Medical Acute Care Unit and the Recuperative Services Unit-are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), an independent, not-for-profit accrediting body, which focuses on the promotion of quality, value and optimal outcomes in the field of human services, including rehabilitation, employment, child and family, and aging services. The MACU and RSU both received three-year accreditations, the highest level of CARF accreditation.

In addition, the RSU has received two consecutive deficiency-free ratings from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, which assesses compliance with federal standards for adequacy of staffing, quality of care, and cleanliness of facilities.

For more information, go to our Web site at http://www.hebrewseniorlife.org/healthcare-hrc-rehabilitative-care.

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Do you have a memory clinic for Russian-speaking residents?
Hebrew Rehabilitation Center offers a Memory Disorders Clinic through our Outpatient Services Department. It is for speakers of all languages. Interpreter services are provided, if needed.

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Do you have all residents with dementia on the same floor?
Many of our residents have dementia; however, we have a special unit for those with dementia-related behaviors that require additional care and services. In 2007, we opened a Specialized Care Unit that manages residents with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. The SCU's therapeutic programs focus on residents' medical, physical, social, emotional, environmental, spiritual and vocational needs while preserving their independence and functional ability. One floor is for residents who are ambulatory and experiencing mid- to late-stage dementia; the other floor is for residents who are no longer able to independently move about and are experiencing late- to end-stage dementia. The primary diagnosis for admission to the SCU is Alzheimer's disease or an associated type of dementia, along with presenting behavioral symptoms that cannot be effectively managed in a less structured environment.

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What do you mean by behaviors?
Many patients with dementia exhibit behaviors such as resistance to care and wandering that require a more structured living environment. It is these behaviors, rather than other psychiatric symptoms, that are appropriate for admission to the Specialized Care Unit. The staff on these units receive training on how to supportively respond to these problems and provide compassionate care and an accepting environment.

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